Olympics

Volleyball has been contested as an indoor sport ever since volleyball was introduced at the 1964 Summer Olympics. The volleyball Olympic tournament originally was a simple competition with a format that paralleled the one still employed in the World Cup. All teams would played against each other team and then were ranked by wins, set average and point average. Unfortunately with this type round-robin system the medal winners could be determined before the end of the games. The audience would lose interest in the outcome of the remaining matches and move on to other Olympic sporting events. The solution was to split the competition into two phases: a “final round” was introduced, consisting of quarterfinals, semifinals and finals. Since its creation in 1972, this new system, usually referred to as the “Olympic format,” has become the standard for the volleyball Olympic tournament.
The number of teams involved in the volleyball Olympic games has grown steadily since 1964. In 1996, both men’s and women’s indoor events had 12 participating nations. Each of the five continental volleyball confederations has at least one affiliated national federation involved in the Olympic Games.

According to the Volleyball Olympic Tournament, the competition formula rules are as follows:

Qualification

  • Twelve teams participate in each event.
  • Host nations are always pre-qualified.
  • Two teams qualify through the World Cup.
  • Five teams qualify as winners of continental qualification tournaments.
  • The four remaining berths are decided in world qualification tournaments.

Competition format

1. For the first phase, called qualification round, teams are ranked by the FIVB World Rankings and then divided in two pools of six teams using the serpentine system. The host nation is always ranked 1.

2. At the qualification round, each team plays one match against all other teams in its pool. Top four teams in each pool advance, the remaining two leave the competition.
3. At the second phase, usually called final round, teams play quarterfinals, semifinals and finals.
4. For the final round, matches are organized according to the results obtained in the qualification round. Let the top four teams in each pool be A1, A2, A3, A4 (group A); and B1, B2, B3, B4 (group B). Quarterfinals would then be: A1xB4; A2xB3; A3xB2; A4xB1.
5. Winners of quarterfinals play semifinals as follows: (A1/B4) x (A3/B2); (A2/B3) x (A4xB1).
6. At the finals, winners of semifinals play for the gold, and losers for the bronze.

The tournament implements very tight line-up restrictions: only twelve players are allowed, and no replacement is permitted, even in case of injuries.

I vividly remember the 2012 final where Russia came back from a 0-2 set deficit by not letting the Brazilians take advantage of any of their 2 match points in the third set. Dmitriy Muserskiy scored 31 points which is an Olympic Games record in a final. Italy beat Bulgaria, taking the Bronze medal. It was during the Russia versus Brazil finals that I received a text message from my younger brother asking me if I knew anything about personal std testing kits. “What the…?” I replied. I am watching this very intense game and now am totally distracted. “What’s going on? Just do a google search for std kits at home testing. In the US you can’t buy an at-home test kit at a drugstore. That’s only possible in Europe. Are you in Europe??” “In NYC – at home for now.” was his reply. I did a quick online search and found several sites and texted my brother: ” Here’s the url of a great site that sells STD testing kits. You get the results in 15 minutes. If they are negative, chill out. If they are positive get yourself to a doctor or clinic. If you have symptoms that persist, get yourself to a doctor or clinic. By the way, use condoms, you jerk. Keep in touch & good luck.” I returned to the game which was in its last excitingly tense 5 minutes. Update: my brother was ok, just a false alarm.

Indoor Olympic Volleyball Champions

2012 London Men

– Gold –
Russia (RUS)
Nikolay Apalikov
Taras Khtey
Sergey Grankin
Sergey Tetyukhin
Aleksandr Sokolov
Yury Berezhko
Aleksandr Butko
Dmitriy Muserskiy
Dmitriy Ilinikh
Maxim Mikhaylov
Aleksandr Volkov
Aleksey Obmochaev

– Silver –

Brazil (BRA)
Bruno Rezende
Wallace de Souza
Sidnei dos Santos Júnior
Leandro Vissotto
Gilberto Godoy Filho
Murilo Endres
Sérgio Santos
Thiago Soares Alves
Rodrigo Santana
Lucas Saatkamp
Ricardo Garcia
Dante Amaral

– Bronze –

Italy (ITA)
Cristian Savani
Luigi Mastrangelo
Simone Parodi
Samuele Papi
Michal Lasko
Ivan Zaytsev
Dante Boninfante
Dragan Travica
Alessandro Fei
Emanuele Birarelli
Andrea Bari
Andrea Giovi

2012 London Women

– Gold –

Brazil (BRA)
Fabiana Claudino
Dani Lins
Paula Pequeno
Adenízia da Silva
Thaísa Menezes
Jaqueline Carvalho
Fernanda Ferreira
Tandara Caixeta
Natália Pereira
Sheilla Castro
Fabiana de Oliveira
Fernanda Garay

– Silver –

United States (USA)
Danielle Scott-Arruda
Tayyiba Haneef-Park
Lindsey Berg
Tamari Miyashiro
Nicole Davis
Jordan Larson
Megan Hodge
Christa Harmotto
Logan Tom
Foluke Akinradewo
Courtney Thompson
Destinee Hooker

– Bronze –

Japan (JPN)
Erika Araki
Yukiko Ebata
Kaori Inoue
Maiko Kano
Saori Kimura
Hitomi Nakamichi
Ai Otomo
Saori Sakoda
Yuko Sano
Risa Shinnabe
Yoshie Takeshita
Mai Yamaguchi

2008 Beijing Men

– Gold –

United States (USA)
Lloyd Ball
Sean Rooney
David Lee
Richard Lambourne
William Priddy
Ryan Millar
Riley Salmon
Thomas Hoff
Clayton Stanley
Kevin Hansen
Gabriel Gardner
Scott Touzinsky

– Silver –

Brazil (BRA)
Bruno Rezende
Marcelo Elgarten
André Heller
Samuel Fuchs
Gilberto Godoy Filho
Murilo Endres
André Nascimento
Sérgio Santos
Anderson Rodrigues
Gustavo Endres
Rodrigo Santana
Dante Amaral

– Bronze –

Russia (RUS)[51]
Aleksandr Korneev
Semyon Poltavskiy
Aleksandr Kosarev
Sergey Grankin
Sergey Tetyukhin
Vadim Khamuttskikh
Yury Berezhko
Aleksey Ostapenko
Aleksandr Volkov
Aleksey Verbov
Maxim Mikhaylov
Aleksey Kuleshov

2008 Beijing Women

– Gold –

Brazil (BRA)
Walewska Oliveira
Carolina Albuquerque
Marianne Steinbrecher
Paula Pequeno
Thaisa Menezes
Hélia Souza
Valeska Menezes
Fabiana Claudino
Welissa Gonzaga
Jaqueline Carvalho
Sheilla Castro
Fabiana de Oliveira

– Silver –

United States (USA)
Ogonna Nnamani
Danielle Scott-Arruda
Tayyiba Haneef-Park
Lindsey Berg
Stacy Sykora
Nicole Davis
Heather Bown
Jennifer Joines
Kim Glass
Robyn Ah Mow-Santos
Kim Willoughby
Logan Tom

– Bronze –

China (CHN)
Wang Yimei
Feng Kun
Yang Hao
Liu Yanan
Wei Qiuyue
Xu Yunli
Zhou Suhong
Zhao Ruirui
Xue Ming
Li Juan
Zhang Na
Ma Yunwen

2004 Athens Men

– Gold –

Brazil (BRA)
Giovane Gávio
André Heller
Maurício Lima
Gilberto Godoy Filho
André Nascimento
Sérgio Santos
Anderson Rodrigues
Nalbert Bitencourt
Gustavo Endres
Rodrigo Santana
Ricardo Garcia
Dante Amaral

– Silver –

Italy (ITA)
Luigi Mastrangelo
Valerio Vermiglio
Samuele Papi
Andrea Sartoretti
Alberto Cisolla
Ventzislav Simeonov
Damiano Pippi
Andrea Giani
Alessandro Fei
Paolo Tofoli
Paolo Cozzi
Matej Černič

– Bronze –

Russia (RUS)
Stanislav Dineykin
Sergei Baranov
Pavel Abramov
Aleksey Kazakov
Sergey Tetyukhin
Vadim Khamuttskikh
Aleksandr Kosarev
Konstantin Ushakov
Taras Khtey
Andrey Egorchev
Aleksey Verbov
Aleksey Kuleshov

2004 Athens Women

– Gold –

China (CHN)
Chen Jing
Feng Kun
Li Shan
Liu Yanan
Song Nina
Wang Lina
Yang Hao
Zhang Na
Zhang Ping
Zhang Yuehong
Zhao Ruirui
Zhou Suhong

– Silver –

Russia (RUS)
Yevgeniya Artamonova
Lioubov Kılıç
Olga Chukanova
Yekaterina Gamova
Aleksandra Korukovets
Olga Nikolaeva
Yelena Plotnikova
Natalya Safronova
Marina Sheshenina
Irina Tebenikhina
Elizaveta Tishchenko
Elena Tyurina

– Bronze –

Cuba (CUB)
Zoila Barros
Rosir Calderón
Nancy Carrillo
Ana Fernández
Maybelis Martínez
Liana Mesa
Anniara Muñoz
Yaima Ortíz
Daimí Ramírez
Yumilka Ruíz
Marta Sánchez
Dulce Tellez

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